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Rated Excellent on TripAdvisor & Top Choice on Lonely Planet 2017 - Ephesus Tour Options ! #Ephesus #EphesusTour #EphesusMuseum #Selcuk #Kusadasi #Izmir #Turkey

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Ephesus Tours August 20 - Come, Visit & Discover Ephesus, Turkey

In all of our cruise stops, this was the only organised tour that we arranged and we were so glad that we did. It was so convenient booking online with every detail of the tour clearly mapped out.
This proved to be almost like a personal tour, with no hard sell stops at shops or hand crafted factories which is just as we like it and without dozens of other people trailing on and off coaches.
Our guide was most friendly and knowledgeable and always looked after our welfare.
Ephesus itself was a never to be forgotten sight.
Thank you ‘No Frills’

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Ephesus Tours August 7 - Ancient City of Ephesus

According to the old legends, Ephesus was founded by the female warriors known as the Amazons. The name of the city is thought to have been derived from “APASAS”, the name of a city in the “KINGDOM OF ARZAWA” meaning the “city of the Mother Goddess”. Ephesus was inhabited from the end of the Bronze Age onwards, but changed its location several times in the course of its long history in accordance with habits and requirements. Carians and Lelegians are to be have been among the city’s first inhabitants. Ionian migrations are said to have begun in around 1200 B.C. According to legend, the city was founded for the second time by Androclus, the son of Codrus, king of Athens, on the shore at the point where the CAYSTER (Küçük Menderes) empties into the sea, a location to which they had been guided by a fish and a wild boar on the advice of the soothsayers. The Ionian cities that grew up in the wake of the Ionian migrations joined in a confederacy under the leadership of Ephesus. The region was devastated during the Cimmerian invasion at the beginning of the 7th century B.C. Under the rule of the Lydian kings, Ephesus became one of the wealthiest cities in the Mediterranean world. The defeat of the Lydian King Croesus by Cyrus, the King of Persia, prepared the way for the extension of Persian hegemony over the whole of the Aegean coastal region. At the beginning of the 5th century, when the Ionian cities rebelled against Persia, Ephesus quickly dissociated itself from the others, thus escaping destruction.
Ephesus remained under Persian rule until the arrival of Alexander the Great in 334 B.C., when it entered upon a fifty year period of peace and tranquillity. Lysimachus, who had been one of the twelve generals of Alexander the Great and became ruler of the region on Alexander’s death, decided to embark upon the development of the city, which he called Arsineia after his wife Arsinoe. He constructed a new harbour and built defence walls on the slopes of the Panayır and Bülbül Mts., moving the whole city 2.5 km to the south-west. Realising, however, that the Ephesians were unwilling to leave their old city, he had the whole sewage system blocked up during a great storm, making the houses uninhabitable and forcing the inhabitants to move. In 281 B.C. the city was re-founded under the old name of Ephesus and became one of the most important of the commercial ports in the Mediterranean.
In 129 B.C. the Romans took advantage of the terms of the will left by Attalos, King of Pergamon, by which they were bequathed his kingdom, to incorporate the whole region into the Roman Empire as the province of Asia. Ancient sources show that at this time the city had a population of 200,000. In the 1st century B.C. the heavy taxes imposed by the Roman government led the population to embrace Mithridates as their savior and to support him in his mutiny against Roman authority and in 88 B.C. a massacre was carried out of all the Latin speaking inhabitants of the city, which was then stormed and sacked by a Roman army under Sulla, It was from the reign of Augustus onwards that the buildings we admire today were constructed. According to documentary sources, the city suffered severe damage in an earthquake in 17 A.D. After that, however, Ephesus became a very important centre of trade and commerce. The historian Aristio describes Ephesus as being recognised by all the inhabitants of the region as the most important trading centre in Asia. It was also the leading political and intellectual centre, with the second school of philosophy in the Aegean. From the 1st century onwards, Ephesus was visited by Christian disciples attempting to spread the Christian belief in a single God and thus forced to seek refuge from Roman persecution. Besides enjoying a privileged position between East and West coupled with an exceptionally fine climate, the city owed its importance to its being the centre of the cult of Artemis.
For the Christians, the city, with its highly advanced way of life, its high standard of living, the variety of its demographic composition and its firmly rooted polytheistic culture, must have presented itself as an ideal pilot region… From written sources we learn that St Paul remained in the city for three years from 65 to 68, and that it was here that he preached his famous sermons calling upon the hearers to embrace the faith in. one God. He taught that God had no need of a house made with human hands and that he was present in all places at all times. This was all greatly resented by the craftsmen who had amassed great wealth from their production of statues of Artemis in gold, silver or other materials. A silversmith by the name of Demetrius stirred up the people and led a crowd of thousands of Ephesians to the theatre, where they booed and stoned Paul and his two colleagues, chanting “Great is Artemis of the Ephesians! Great is Artemis of the Ephesians!” So turbulent was the crowd that Paul and his companions escaped only with great difficulty. From his Epistles to the communities it would appear that Paul spent some time as a prisoner in Ephesus.
Legend has it that St John the Evangelist came to Ephesus with the Virgin Mary in his care. Some also say that it was here that he wrote his Gospel and was finally buried. In 269 Ephesus and the surrounding country was devastated by the Goths. At that time there was still a temple in which the cult of Artemis was practised. In 381, by order of the Emperor Theodosius, the temple was closed down, and in the following centuries it lay completely abandoned, serving as a quarry for building materials.
The situation of the city, which had given it its privileged geographical position, was also the cause of its decline and fall. The prosperity of the city had been based on its possession of a sheltered natural harbour, but by the Roman period ships reached the harbour to the west of Mt Pion 1.5 km from the Temple of Artemis through a very narrow and difficult channel. The cause of this was the Meander (Cayster) River, which emptied into the Aegean a little to the west of the city of Ephesus, where it created a delta formed by the alluvium carried down by the river over thousands of years. By the late Byzantine era the channel had been so silted up as to be no longer usable. The sea gradually receded farther and farther, while the marshy lands around the harbour gave rise to a number of diseases, such as malaria. The new outlook that had arisen with the spread of Christianity led to the gradual abandonment of all buildings bearing witness to the existence of polytheistic cults and the construction in their place of Christian churches. In the year 431 the third Ecumenical council took place in Ephesus.
Emperor Theodosius convoked another council in Ephesus in 449, which came to be known as the “robber council”. From the 6th century onwards the Church of St John was an important place of pilgrimage, and Justinian took measures to protect it by having.the whole hill on which it stood surrounded by defence walls. Shortly afterwards, the Church of the Virgin and other places of worship were destroyed and pillaged in Arab raids. In the 7th century the city was transferred to the site now occupied by the town of Selçuk and during the Byzantine era Ephesus grew up around the summit of Mt Ayasuluğ. The city enjoyed its last years of prosperity under the Selçuk Emirate of the Aydınoğulları. During the Middle Ages the city ceased to function as a port.
By the 20th century the silt carried down by the Meander had extended the plain for a distance of 5 km.

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Ephesus Tours June 30 - Come, Visit & Discover Ephesus, Turkey

15 things that you need to know before creating an Turkey e Visa application
ephesus.co/apply-for-y…

evisa.gov.tr is a government portal run by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Turkey.
e-Visa applications can be created for an individual, for a family (minimum of 2 and maximum of 10 people) or for a group (minimum of 10 and maximum of 300 people).
e-Visa is valid for touristic and trade purposes only.
You can check if you are eligible for e-Visa by clicking “Main Page > Apply” and selecting your country/region of travel document. Each traveler must obtain a separate e-Visa, including infants and children (even if children/infants are included in their parents’ passports).
Your travel document must be valid for at least 6 months from the date you intend to enter Turkey. Depending on your nationality, there may be additional requirements. You will be informed of these requirements after you select your nationality and travel dates.
You can find out about the e-Visa fee by clicking “Main Page > Apply” and selecting your nationality.
You can only make payment by Mastercard and Visa credit/debit card. The card is not required to be under your name. Kindly make sure that your card has “3D Secure System” and is open to international transactions.
After you receive the “e-mail address verification message”, you must click the “approve” button and proceed with the payment within 24 hours. Otherwise, your application will time out, the system will not accept payment, and you will need to create a new application.
Kindly inform the e-Visa Support Desk (Main Page > Contact Us > Contact Form) should you encounter any suspended or unsuccessful transactions during the application procedure. Please do not create a new application or make a new payment unless otherwise advised. The Ministry will not be responsible for additional payments and no refund will be granted in case of such unfinished transactions.
The e-Visa fee can be made only in US Dollars. You do not have to have a USD account. An equivalent amount in your local currency will be deducted from your account.
After you make payment, the link to download your e-Visa will be e-mailed to you. Passport control officers at the ports of entry can verify your e-Visa in their system. However, you are advised to keep your e-Visa with you either as a softcopy (on tablet pc, smartphone etc.) or as a hardcopy in case of any failure in the system.
The validity period of your e-Visa is different than the duration of stay. You may enter Turkey at any time within the validity period. Please note that if you wish to enter Turkey earlier than the date specified on your e-Visa, you must create a new application.
Once the e-Visa is processed, none of the information on it can be changed. The information on your e-Visa must be exactly the same as the information on your travel document. Otherwise, your e-Visa will be invalid and there will be no refund for it.
There are numerous web sites which claim to assist users in receiving Turkish e-Visas in return of a service charge. These websites are not endorsed by or associated with the Turkish government. Therefore, we cannot be held responsible for any misuse of information or failure of service on their side.
The e-Visa application has no connection with Turkish Embassies or Consulates General. For any questions or comments, kindly contact the e-Visa Support Desk by clicking on Main Page > Contact Us.
Turkish Electronic Visa Application System

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